Person: Dick Sloan

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October is a busy month in the fields – not only are corn and soybean harvest underway, but it’s time to plant winter small grains for next year’s harvest. Our small grains shared learning call this month therefore featured Paul Mugge and Dick Sloan, farmers who have been growing winter small grains for several years, […]

October 11, 2017 

BLOG POST

PFI Cooperators’ Program celebrates 30 years of farmer-led on-farm researchFor Release: September 28, 2017 Tom Frantzen, New Hampton Dick Sloan, Rowley Jeff Olson, Winfield Contacts: Nick Ohde | Research & Media Coordinator | Practical Farmers of Iowa | (515) 232-5661 | [email protected] Stefan Gailans | Research & Field Crops Director | Practical Farmers of Iowa [...]

September 28, 2017 

NEWS RELEASE

Ahead of our annual conference last month, we held a short course titled “Conserving $$ and Soil.” Often the conservation of farm production input costs and soil might be considered at odds with one another. Soil conservation efforts are thought to cost money to implement and/or they might involve producing less which would in turn lose […]

February 1, 2017 

BLOG POST

Passing on knowledge from farmer to farmer works because farmers are credible to each other. Supporting this farmer-led model is what we strive to do at Practical Farmers of Iowa. Our 2017 annual conference, “Pass It On” (Jan. 201-21 – learn more here), celebrates this model and the impact of farmer-to-farmer learning on farmers’ confidence […]

December 15, 2016 

BLOG POST

Delaying cover crop termination until corn planting is commonly understood to cause corn yield drag. However, the potential for increased cover crop growth by delaying termination has farmers wondering if that yield drag is true and/or can be overcome. Farmer-cooperator Dick Sloan planted corn on the same date (May 5) following two cover crop termination dates: […]

December 5, 2016 

BLOG POST

In a Nutshell
• Delaying cover crop termination until
corn planting is commonly understood
to cause corn yield drag. However,
the potential for increased cover crop
growth by delaying termination has
farmers wondering if that yield drag is
true and/or can be overcome.
• Farmer-cooperator Dick Sloan planted
corn on the same date (May 5)
following two cover crop termination
dates: 2 weeks prior to planting corn
(early) and 2 days prior to planting corn
(late).
Key Findings
• Sloan saw a 5 bu/ac corn yield
reduction with the late termination
date.
• Corn stands were not affected by cover
crop termination date.
• Soil temperatures were slightly warmer
for one week in May in the early
termination date.

November 17, 2016 

RESEARCH REPORT

• Two farmers tested Spray strips and
No-Spray control strips of cereal rye for
fungicide residue.
• This project was a secondary project
within “Fungicide and Plant Growth
Regulator Effect on Cereal Rye
Production” (Gailans et al., 2016).
Key Findings
• At Sieren’s farm, no propiconazole
residue was found above the
detectable limit of 0.05 ppm in No-
Spray control strips.
• At Sloan’s farm, metconazole residues
of 0.02 ppm were found in both control
strip samples, compared to the 1.30
ppm baseline residue level in the
sprayed sample.

October 20, 2016 

RESEARCH REPORT

In recent years, a growing number of farmers have become interested in raising their own cereal rye seed to use as cover crop seed. However, fungal diseases and lodging can present challenges to raising small grain crops, like cereal rye, in Iowa. Warm and humid conditions during heading and grain fill periods are conducive to fungal […]

October 10, 2016 

BLOG POST

In a Nutshell
• Fungal diseases and lodging can
present challenges to raising small
grain crops, like cereal rye, in Iowa.
• Farmer-cooperators investigated the
use of fungicides and plant growth
regulators on cereal rye seed crops
to determine effects on yield and
germination rate.
Key Findings
• Across four fields at three farms, in only
one instance, when a fungicide was
paired with a growth regulator, were
cereal rye seed yields and financial
returns improved.
• Germination percentage of harvested
seed was generally greater than 90%
regardless of treatment.

September 30, 2016 

RESEARCH REPORT

Dick Sloan farms near Rowley in northeastern Iowa. For the past two years, he has conducted on-farm research on soybeans grown from neonicotinoid-treated and untreated seeds, and found no differences in yield. As a result, he has been able to cut input costs on his farm. Matt O’Neal, research entomologist at Iowa State University, will discuss recent research on the possible negative impacts of neonicotinoids, along with management alternatives for growers.

March 9, 2016 

FARMINAR