Person: Scott Shriver

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Roller-crimping as a method for terminating cover crops in organic and no-till farms in Iowa is gaining interest, but many questions still remain about best management practices. In this farminar, three Iowa farmers will share their experiences using a roller crimper in their respective organic operations. Scott Shriver and Francis Thicke will focus on cereal rye going into soybeans, and Billy Sammons will share his experience with hairy vetch going into corn.

Billy Sammons farms with Joanna Hunter near Churdan. They are in the process of transitioning to organic certification and are incorporating many no-till principals. Billy has used a roller-crimper for two seasons.
Scott Shriver has been growing corn, soybeans, and small grains organically near Jefferson for 18 years. Scott has grown rye cover crops for years but just started experimenting with a roller crimper in 2017.
Francis Thicke is a soil scientist and organic, grass-based dairy farmer near Fairfield, who has experience rolling a cereal rye cover crop after drilling soybeans.

November 28, 2017 

FARMINAR

Cover crops are gaining new attention for their ability to reduce weed pressure in soybeans. Specifically, when seeding soybeans directly into a thick cover crop. In the past two years, farmer-researchers Jeremy Gustafson and Jack Boyer have documented reduced herbicide use when planting soybeans into a tall, thick cereal rye cover crop that they chemically terminated […]

November 15, 2017 

BLOG POST

• Cover crops are gaining new attention
for their ability to reduce weed
pressure in soybeans. Specifically,
when seeding soybeans directly into a
thick cover crop.
• Farmer-cooperators Jack Boyer and
Scott Shriver investigated the effect
of row-width on soybean yields when
rolling a cereal rye cover crop. Boyer
rolled select strips after terminating
with an herbicide; Shriver used a
roller-crimper to terminate his cover
crop.
Key Findings
• The narrowest soybean row-width at
both farms (10-in. at Boyer’s; 7.5-in. at
Shriver’s) resulted in greatest yields.
• Boyer saw the greatest return on
investment where he drilled soybeans
in 10-in. rows and did not roll the
cover crop after chemical termination.
The drill itself appeared to lay down
much of the cover crop residue.

 

RESEARCH REPORT

Improving organic farming with small grains, flame-weeding and special hybrids is focus of Practical Farmers of Iowa field day Sept. 13, near Jefferson For Release: August 31, 2012 Download PDF (132 kB) View Fullscreen

August 31, 2012 

NEWS RELEASE